craftsman vs. ryobi router?

I have narrowed my options between these two router/table combos…

Craftsman:
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00928180000P

Ryobi:
http://www.homedepot.com/Tools-Hardware-Power-Tools-Routers/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xj1Zbaus/R-100618267/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

Any info or feedback on either product would be great.

Filed Under: Ryobi Power Tools

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  1. Big Deal Maker says:

    Craftsman for a router. They do build a good router and you will not have the problems with it as you will with a ryobi.
    Ryobi makes 2 good products that i like. One is a Cordless Drill (18v is best for me)
    The other is a job site 10″ Table saw. Outside of that.. nothing.

  2. t-townbob says:

    Neither one are professional level tools.

    Because you’re purchasing a router table I assume you’re trying to make something nice, or woodworking is a hobby of yours. In my experience entry level tools like this are not worth the plasitc they’re made out of and you’ll be very frustrated working with them and end up doing inferior work. I also find these tools to be much more dangerous.

    My advice is to do some more research: There are lots of router table reviews online. And buy a quality product that you’ll enjoy using.

  3. callipygenous says:

    Both of those tools are crap. They don’t have the power to do serious router work on a table. Just like on the table saw question, you are back to Delta or Porter Cable. Once again, what are you trying to do?

    So far, your choices in tools makes me think you just want to hack at stuff. If that’s the case, either one is fine, but I’d go with Harbor Freight or Chicago Tool and save yourself some bucks.

    The finest router tables are made by Porter Cable and the finest shapers (big professional sized router tables) are made by Delta.

    Here’s a nice shaper:

    http://stlouis.craigslist.org/tls/1664832735.html

    Good price too, considering.

    Here’s a nice router for a router table, but the table comes separate:

    http://www.deltaportercable.com/Products/ProductDetail.aspx?ProductID=11099

    You can build your own router table by looking at this:

    http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1907670/build_your_own_router_table/

    Good luck, man.

  4. DanB says:

    If you’re like me, you have to buy the best you can afford. Both products are OK but just try getting service on the Ryobi…Craftsman has a great guarantee and Sears/Kmarts are easy to find.

  5. John M says:

    Craftsman used to mean quality, replaceable quality free of charge.
    Not any more. Ryobi isn’t bad but it all depends on the extent of the work
    being done. Wear and tear makes anything wear out. For the Money
    go Ryobi, Milwaukee, or Makita even Delta.

  6. Rick says:

    I have one of those ryobi router table combinations. My main complaint is that the measurement marks for the fence aren’t accurate and the fence has a nasty (and potentially dangerous) habit of coming loose and moving right in the middle of a cut, no matter how tight you get the hold-downs.

  7. Ken L says:

    id go with porter cable, ryobi is ok but cheap

  8. Polyhistor says:

    Since Craftsman is made by Ryobi, it does not make much difference.

    Look for Makita, Hitachi, or another brand that will be better. I fyou want a really good one, buy Bosch.

  9. Jim S says:

    Look, I’m not going to get into a “mine’s bigger/better than yours” contest, but I do have something to say. Consider what you’re going to use these tools for. If you are trying to work professionally buy the best you can afford because you’ll be using them every day and you’ll need tools you can rely on for years and that can take hard use. If you’re doing stuff around the house you might not need pro quality tools. I’ve got a Ryobi router with a table and it works great for what I do with it. I wouldn’t try to make furniture but it works great for shaping the edges of shelving, making plunge cuts, etc. I have a Sears compound miter saw that’s been a great time saver. It’s got a laser but most of the time I don’t rely on it. Check the square of your blades to the tables with a carpenter’s square before starting projects. If you’re going to make precision cuts, invest in a blade with more teeth than the standard cheapo that comes with the tool. Your largest expense is going to be router bits, without a doubt, so check around and compare prices.

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